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Proven potency without increased safety risks1-3

FLAREX® demonstrated superior efficacy in treating ocular surface inflammation1,a

FLAREX was more effective vs FML® (fluorometholone ophthalmic suspension, USP) 0.1%,* P=0.03.1

Clinical efficacy of FLAREX vs fluorometholone alcohol derivative (FML*) at the end of an FDA pivotal trial1

68% of ocular surface inflammation was cured with FLAREX VS 43% with FML* within 13 days1

In a clinical trial, there were no adverse reactions reported in the FLAREX and fluorometholone alcohol (FML*) groups1,a

Adverse reactions may include glaucoma with optic nerve damage, visual acuity and field defects, cataract formation, secondary ocular infection following suppression of host response, and perforation of the globe.4

FLAREX demonstrated similar efficacy to prednisolone acetate 1.0% in treating ocular surface inflammation1,b

In an FDA pivotal trial, there was no significant difference in clinical efficacy with FLAREX vs prednisolone acetate 1.0%, P=0.491

73% of ocular surface inflammation was cured with FLAREX vs 76% with prednisolone acetate 1.0% within 13 days1

There were no adverse reactions reported in the FLAREX and prednisolone acetate treatment groups1,b

  • No statistically significant difference in speed to cure rate was observed between FLAREX and prednisolone acetate 1.0%, P=0.411
  • No patients experienced worsening of symptoms in either treatment group1

aSTUDY DESIGN: The efficacy and safety of FLAREX were evaluated in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial in 78 patients with ocular surface inflammation (eg, conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis) in one or both eyes. Patients administered either FLAREX (n=41) or FML* (n=37) every 2 hours for the first 2 days and then every 4 hours thereafter, with signs and symptoms of inflammation assessed at Days 1, 3, 8, and 13. At each visit, investigators determined if symptoms in the involved eye were resolved (cured), improved, unchanged, or worsened. If a patient was rated as cured before the end of the study, steroid drops were discontinued and the patient was considered to have completed the trial.1

bSTUDY DESIGN: The efficacy and safety of FLAREX were evaluated in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial in 82 patients with ocular surface inflammation (eg, conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis) in one or both eyes. Patients administered either FLAREX (n=37) or prednisolone acetate 1.0% (n=45) every 2 hours for the first 2 days and then every 4 hours thereafter, with signs and symptoms of inflammation assessed at Days 1, 3, 8, and 13. At each visit, investigators determined if symptoms in the involved eye were resolved (cured), improved, unchanged, or worsened. If a patient was rated as cured before the end of the study, steroid drops were discontinued and the patient was considered to have completed the trial.1

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

FLAREX® (fluorometholone acetate ophthalmic suspension) is indicated for use in the treatment of steroid-responsive inflammatory conditions of the palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, and anterior segment of the eye.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Contraindicated in acute superficial herpes simplex keratitis, vaccinia, varicella, and most other viral diseases of the cornea and conjunctiva; mycobacterial infection of the eye; fungal diseases; acute purulent untreated infections, which like other diseases caused by microorganisms, may be masked or enhanced by the presence of the steroid; and in those persons who have known hypersensitivity to any component of this preparation.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Topical Ophthalmic Use Only: Not for injection.

Intraocular Pressure Increase: Prolonged use may result in glaucoma, damage to the optic nerve, and defects in visual acuity and visual field. It is advisable that the intraocular pressure be checked frequently.

Cataracts: Use of corticosteroids may result in cataract formation.

Delayed Healing: Topical ophthalmic corticosteroids may slow corneal wound healing. In those diseases causing thinning of the cornea or sclera, perforation has been known to occur with chronic use of topical steroids.

Viral Infections: Use in the treatment of herpes simplex infection requires great caution.

Bacterial Infections: Use of corticosteroids may suppress the host response and thus aid in the establishment of secondary ocular infections. Acute purulent infections of the eye may be masked or exacerbated by the presence of steroid medication.

Fungal Infections: Fungal infections of the cornea are particularly prone to develop coincidentally with long-term local steroid application. Fungus invasion must be considered in any persistent corneal ulceration where a steroid has been used or is in use.

Contamination: Do not touch dropper tip to any surface as this may contaminate the suspension.

Contact Lens Wear: Contact lenses should be removed during instillation of FLAREX but may be reinserted after 15 minutes.

Temporarily Blurred Vision: Vision may be temporarily blurred following dosing with FLAREX. Care should be exercised in operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Glaucoma with optic nerve damage, visual acuity and field defects, cataract formation, secondary ocular infection following suppression of host response, and perforation of the globe may occur.

Postmarketing Experience: The following reaction has been identified during postmarketing use of FLAREX in clinical practice. Because reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of unknown size, estimates of frequency cannot be made. The reaction, which has been chosen for inclusion due to either its seriousness, frequency of reporting, possible causal connection to FLAREX, or a combination of these factors, includes dysgeusia.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information.

References: 1. Leibowitz HM, Hyndiuk RA, Lindsey C, et al. Fluorometholone acetate: clinical evaluation in the treatment of external ocular inflammation. Ann Ophthalmol. 1984;16(12):1110-1115. 2. Sendrowski DP, Jaanus SD, Semes LP, et al. Anti-inflammatory drugs. In: Bartlett JD, Jaanus SD, eds. Clinical Ocular Pharmacology. 5th ed. St Louis, MO: Butterworth-Heinemann; 2008:221-244. 3. Shah P, Westwell AD. The role of fluorine in medicinal chemistry. J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2007;22(5):527-540. 4. FLAREX [package insert]. Fort Worth, TX: Alcon Laboratories, Inc; 2017.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

FLAREX® (fluorometholone acetate ophthalmic suspension) is indicated for use in the treatment of steroid-responsive inflammatory conditions of the palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, and anterior segment of the eye.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Contraindicated in acute superficial herpes simplex keratitis, vaccinia, varicella, and most other viral diseases of the cornea and conjunctiva; mycobacterial infection of the eye; fungal diseases; acute purulent untreated infections, which like other diseases caused by microorganisms, may be masked or enhanced by the presence of the steroid; and in those persons who have known hypersensitivity to any component of this preparation.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Topical Ophthalmic Use Only: Not for injection.

Intraocular Pressure Increase: Prolonged use may result in glaucoma, damage to the optic nerve, and defects in visual acuity and visual field. It is advisable that the intraocular pressure be checked frequently.

Cataracts: Use of corticosteroids may result in cataract formation.

Delayed Healing: Topical ophthalmic corticosteroids may slow corneal wound healing. In those diseases causing thinning of the cornea or sclera, perforation has been known to occur with chronic use of topical steroids.

Viral Infections: Use in the treatment of herpes simplex infection requires great caution.

Bacterial Infections: Use of corticosteroids may suppress the host response and thus aid in the establishment of secondary ocular infections. Acute purulent infections of the eye may be masked or exacerbated by the presence of steroid medication.

Fungal Infections: Fungal infections of the cornea are particularly prone to develop coincidentally with long-term local steroid application. Fungus invasion must be considered in any persistent corneal ulceration where a steroid has been used or is in use.

Contamination: Do not touch dropper tip to any surface as this may contaminate the suspension.

Contact Lens Wear: Contact lenses should be removed during instillation of FLAREX but may be reinserted after 15 minutes.

Temporarily Blurred Vision: Vision may be temporarily blurred following dosing with FLAREX. Care should be exercised in operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Glaucoma with optic nerve damage, visual acuity and field defects, cataract formation, secondary ocular infection following suppression of host response, and perforation of the globe may occur.

Postmarketing Experience: The following reaction has been identified during postmarketing use of FLAREX in clinical practice. Because reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of unknown size, estimates of frequency cannot be made. The reaction, which has been chosen for inclusion due to either its seriousness, frequency of reporting, possible causal connection to FLAREX, or a combination of these factors, includes dysgeusia.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information.